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Western Australia

Buddhist Council of
Western Australia

The BCWA was formed in 1995 to serve as a peak body to represent the Buddhist community at government level and national levels... website

South Australia

Buddhist Council of
South Australia

The BCSA was incorporated on the 25th October 2005 to serve as the representative organisation for Buddhist temples, groups and organisations in South Australia... website

Queensland

Buddhist Council of
Queensland

The BCQ, which was created in 1999, has brought a large number of Buddhist centres and societies together, for their common benefit... website

New South Wales

Buddhist Council of
New South Wales

On the instigation of the World Fellowship of Buddhists, a meeting was held in 1984 in Sydney to establish a regional branch and thus form the Buddhist Council of NSW... website

Victoria

Buddhist Council
of Victoria

The Buddhist Council of Victoria, formed in 1995, is an actively engaged body representing the needs of Buddhists to all levels of government in the state of Victoria... website

Senate Inquiry on the Government’s Exposure Draft of the Marriage Amendment Bill
Tuesday, 07 February 2017 20:53

Federation of Australian Buddhist Councils (FABC)’s Submission

The Buddhist position on gender quality and same sex marriage

In Buddhist traditions, there is no fixed or mandated form of marriage and from a Buddhist point of view there is no such thing as a single fixed, natural, or pre-ordained form of marriage.

Buddhist texts do not contain prohibitions on same-sex marriage. Nor do they contain anti-LGBTQ views.

Our principles are guided by wisdom and compassion, and our concern here is for the alleviating of suffering of marginalized people. The empirical evidence strongly supports the contention that ending the ban on same-sex marriage creates a positive outcome for LGBTQ people

The FABC position on the Bill

We welcome and support the Bill introducing Civil Marriage equality in Australia. We applaud the government for this Bill however we humbly ask for the deletion of S 47A of the Bill.

Ideally, no Marriage Celebrant under the Civil Marriage Act should be entitled to refuse to solemnise a marriage against a person’s sexual orientation. This would be legalised discrimination. However, we understand the need to protect religious freedoms and for that reason, we are agreeable to Religious Marriage Celebrants being legally entitled to refuse to solemnise a marriage based on the celebrant’s conscientious or religious beliefs. However, it is our view that this right should not extend to Civil Marriage celebrants.

In our view, Civil Marriage Celebrants should not be empowered by the law to discriminate against the LGBTIQ community. We believe that one of the purposes of the law is to protect and strengthen the whole community. Imagine how it would feel to be told that a civil service is being legally denied to you only on the basis of personal prejudice against you. That would be bring much unnecessary harm and is unacceptable from a Buddhist standpoint

For the reasons above, a deletion of Section 47A of the Bill is necessary.

 

Yours faithfully,

Cecilia Mitra LLB hons (Singapore LLM (UWA)

President
Federation of Australian Buddhist Councils (FABC)

 
Christmas Greetings
Wednesday, 21 December 2016 16:19

We take this opportunity to wish everyone a Happy and Peaceful Christmas and New Year.

We look forward to more dialogue and working together with the government and the different faith groups in harmony.

May all be well and happy!

 
Buddhism Teachers Struggling to Keep Up with Demand from State Schools
Saturday, 17 December 2016 19:35

By Samantha Turnbull (ABC North Coast) | Dec 2016:

New South Wales public schools are struggling to keep up with demand for Buddhism scripture teachers.

Buddhist Council of New South Wales chairman Brian White said there were more than 3,000 public school students across the state studying Buddhism, and the number was growing rapidly.

"It's driven by a few things — general raising of awareness in meditation right across society and how beneficial that can be, and the realisation that even six and seven-year-olds can meditate for a few minutes and benefit from that," Mr White said.

Audio: High demand for Buddhism scripture classes (ABC News)